We went on a road trip!

Last month, Gary, Trina, Joel and I took a day off work, and drove down to Canberra, to see Cartier’s exhibition of historical jewels on display at the National Gallery of Australia.  Established in 1847 in Paris, by Louis-François Cartier, Cartier is today an internationally recognised jewellery and watch manufacturer.

A beautiful day for a drive.

Famous for their garland style designs from the early 1900’s, it is of little wonder Cartier became known as the ‘Jeweller to Kings’ –  creating tiaras and ornate adornments for aristocrats, socialites and royalty.

Cartier Paris Tiara – 1905, choker necklace & Lily stomacher brooch 1906. Platinum and diamonds.

Cartier was heralded as a pioneer in the Art Deco style – their early use of minimalist and geometric shapes in their jewellery predated the First World War, and continued well into the 1930s.

Cartier Paris Brooch – Rock crystal, diamond, enamel, mother of pearl and sapphire -1924

During the late 1940’s the panther motif was introduced to their collection and became a quintessential Cartier symbol across their entire range, known as the Panthère de Cartier.  From pave sections adorning handbag clasps – mimicking the spots of a panther, to the three-dimensional panther brooch owned by Wallis Simpson (The Duchess of Windsor), the Panthère de Cartier collection has had many famous advocates – and is still going strong today!

Cartier Paris Brooch Watch – the reverse side of the rectangular Panther motif section has a watch dial – 1928

Wandering through the exhibition, it was interesting to see how the motifs evolved over the decades, and to see where the designers drew their inspiration from.  The archaeological exploration of Egypt, travel of the Royal family to India, and the art of East and Southeast Asia opened up an exotic source of inspiration, which they applied to all sorts of creations – cigarette cases, jewellery, clocks and watches.

Cartier Paris Bangle – Coral, emerald and onyx – 1930

Over 300 pieces were on display – a combination of Cartier’s collection and loaned pieces from private collections worldwide.  The jewels of Grace Kelly (Later Princess Grace of Monaco), Elizabeth Taylor, Sir Elton John and the Royal family were part of the exhibition.

Cartier Halo tiara made in 1936, belongs to Queen Elizabeth II and was worn by Kate Middleton on her wedding day in 2011

Before heading back to Sydney, Joel and I stopped at Lerida Estate Winery opposite Lake George, for a late lunch and a glass of their pinot rose.  When a winemaker compares the colour of their wine to an Argyle pink diamond, you know they have taste!

Scroll down to see a few more images taken on our journey.

The entry into the National Art Gallery of Australia, Canberra, ACT
‘The Garland Style’ – Cartier Paris Devant de Corsage – Platinum, diamond and pearls – 1902
Guilloché enamel barometer – Silver, gold, silver gilt enamel – 1908
Watch necklace – 1910. Guilloché enamel is a technique involving engine turning a pattern on gold, then firing with a vitreous transparent enamel over the top.
Cartier Paris bracelet watch – c.1910
Cartier Paris Snake Necklace – Platinum and diamond – 1919
Cartier Vanity Case – c.1920
Cartier London sautoir – Diamonds and rubies – 1924. This piece was amazingly flat in profile.
Cartier Paris for Cartier New York Panther pattern evening bag – 1924
Trina and Alice looking through one of the double-sided displays. The craftsmanship is not limited to the front of pieces, with the other side showing as much detail as the front.
Cartier Paris Vanity case – this is actually a photo of the back – 1924
Cartier Paris vanity case – 1925
Cartier powder compact and lipstick holder – 1925
Cartier Paris necklace – special order for the Maharaja of Patiala – 1928.
Two coral bracelets – inspiration from the East – 1930
Cartier London Collier – Platinum, Emeralds and diamonds – 1932
Cartier Paris – Imperial Jadeite strand – 1934. Like Australian opal, magnificent jadeite commands some of the highest prices among gems in today’s international market.
Cartier Bib Necklace – Gold, Turquoise and diamonds – 1955
Cartier Bangle – Gold turquoise and diamond – 1953
Diamond setters are a different part of the jewellery trade. Jewellers create the mountings, then the setters place and secure the gemstones.
Many of the hand tools we use today are the same as the ones used by jewellers in the 1800s. Hammers, files, saw-frames, blocks and punches have not changed over the centuries.
The official book of the exhibition, with stunning close up photographs of the pieces viewed.
Lerida Estate, Lake George – the perfect spot for a late lunch.
Inside Lerida Cafe – with the winery next door.
Lerida Estate Pinot Rose – a good drop!
Taking in the lovely views of Lake George from the winery, before heading home.

 

 

 

 


By Alice | Posted on August 28, 2018

Handmaking a Pink Diamond Pendant.

When we aren’t busy making beautiful pieces for clients, we are creating new pieces for our boutique.  Recently inspired by a lovely pink diamond and geometric shapes, Gary designed this 18ct white gold pendant.  I hope you enjoy this gallery of images, capturing the evolution of this one-off piece.

 

Gary’s bench sketch providing details for Joel to work from.
Using a scribe to mark out detail before saw piercing.
Saw piercing to remove sections of gold, creating the decorative pattern on the top plate.
Positioning the diamond settings.
When the piece was completed, Gary felt like something was missing…
Adding 2 rows of diamonds around the frame was the finishing touch!

Thanks for viewing!  If you are interested in this piece or wish to learn more about Australian pink diamonds, please get in touch with us via email giulians@giulians.com.au or by filling out the form below.

Contact Us

Book a Discovery Session today
  • This field is for validation purposes and should be left unchanged.

 


By Alice | Posted on July 26, 2018